Thursday, July 07, 2005

London suffers a major terrorist attack!: Updates July 8th

Our hearts and prayers go out from all over the world to the people of London on this day of tragedy and fear. Stand tall and stick together over there in the U.K., all races and nationalities and religions. You have been here before and you have survived by working and sticking together. Don't let terror win in the U.K. or anywhere else on the planet. Don't allow the attackers to divide your great nation. Work together to help bring an end to these attacks on innocent civilians.

BBC News: London rocked by terror attacks
CNN News: London rocked by bombs
Google News: London terrorist attacks
Google News: G8 Summit news updates
G8 Gleneagles 2005 official website
G8 & African leaders July 8th live press statement from Gleneagles

Updates July 8th:
After watching the news yesterday and today about the terrorist attacks on the people of London I saw that the various TV news networks were showing the same video footage over and over and over (pooled video images). I read today at eWeek an article by Libe Goad describing how digital photography fans are using the online photo-sharing service Flickr to pool their images of the aftermath of the London bombings and the worldwide outpouring of human emotion. You can read the article "Flickr Pics Capture London Terror" here and view the more than 630 photographs from the Flickr 7/7 Community Pool here. I'm one of the very fortunate people that has friends in London who have been able to escape death and injury in yesterday's attacks. I am very thankfull that some at least were able to notify me ASAP that they were O.K., excluding their shock and grief.

In addition to the eWeek article update I have also added new links to the official G8 Summit 2005 Gleneagles website and a link to today's (streaming video) press conference by U.K. Prime Minister Tony Blair and AU President Olusegun Obasanjo (President of Nigeria). It would seem from P.M. Blair's and President Obasanjo's statements today re: the G8 Summit 2005 Communique that we (who have been raising lot's of heck) have at least some of what we have asked for and demanded re: increased financial assistance and debt relief for Africa. Now it is everybody's job who cares and can contribute something (other than hot air) to make sure that these guys stick to their promises and that we do our part together with the people of Africa to make it work over the next few decades. I know that this isn't the best English grammar I could use to express myself, but I think that you my readers get the idea. Right?

I also found some very good information that may help explain in generally understandable language the complex issues of aid and development and economic justice for Africa. I'm gonna read it over the next few days, attempt to understand it myself, then post about it ASAP together with some other news and views about Africa that's been on my mind.

Lastly, I greet and thank all the new visitors to Jewels in the Jungle and a special Thanks for your great comments and kind encouragement.

Ciao for Now.



5 comments:

Imnakoya said...

Thanks for the pictures and the (unbillable) hours invested in blogging about Africa. Now it up to the African leaders to step up to the plate. By the way, I feel you have to address the oxymoronic adjective: "Afrophilic", some have tagged you, don't you think?

Black River Eagle said...

When it comes to labels attributed to my person I'm sort of like the "Duke" (Duke Ellington) on that issue. I didn't know that someone was tagging me with labels, nor do I care.

I did read that Ethan used the term Afrophile to describe (presumably) non-African born writers who write and publish about Africa. Also the guy over at BBC's Weblog Watch used the term Afro-bloggers in his July 4th 2005 article to describe some blog authors writing about Live8 and the recent G8 Summit.

In both cases the terms are foolish and describe absolutely nothing, albeit I admire Ethan's writings and contributions to the Blogosphere and Africa and am most appreciative for the "Hat Tip" towards Jewels in the Jungle from the BBC's Weblog Watch on July 4th.

Try searching online via Cambridge Dictionaries or Google for the words "Afrophile" or "Afrophilic" and see what you come up with: Zilch that's what. How can you label a man's writings whose ancestry can be traced back centuries to Africa, the Americas, and Europe as the work of an Afrophile or an Americaphile or an Europhile?

Is the situation in Africa today a hobby for someone, and if so, who? 'Nuff said on this subject I presume, oder?

P.S. No need to thank me for sharing my thoughts and research and opinions about Africa, thank our ancestors. They are the driving forces behind this blog and your own. 100% Guaranteed!

Ndesanjo Macha said...

Great work, and thanks for comments. Is your Tanzanian friend planning on blogging at some point?

Black River Eagle said...

Thanks Ndesanjo for the compliment and encouragement. My friend (aka The Professor) is aware of what blogging is all about through our conversations over the last year or so. However, he hasn't found the time (or the courage) to enter the fray just yet. I don't think that he will be able to hold out much longer though as he loves to talk and argue with people about the real story behind modern day Africa.

If he does start writing for the Blogosphere it will be a Doozie and a must read for "Afrophiles". After all, he attended university together with a number of Africa's big men (heads of state, etc.) and knows them personally and up close dating from their revolutionary beginnings up to their present day "respected political leader" status.

Perhaps this is what is holding him back; that he simply knows too much about the truth behind a number of Africa's leaders past and present (and their support networks of partners in the West and in the East).

I'll notify my readers if and when "The Professor from Tanzania" goes LIVE in the Blogosphere.

UARIDI said...

Thank you for your best wishes for us Londoners (including and especially transplanted African roses)

We continue to stand together and defy all those who attack innocent people.